Author: Kangaeroo

Kangaroo Crank

Kangaroo crank from Maruishi Cycle


Continuing on from yesterday’s entry, there’s more Maruishi Cycle brilliance on show.
Here is a bicycle crank featuring a kangaroo motif.
This work is especially notable as it was done before World War II.
Also note the kangaroo print on the pedal shaft.
Pretty amazing bit of work, though the kangaroo connection remains a bit of a mystery, yet once again forms a link between Japan and Australia.

Kangaroos Have a Proud History Adorning Japanese Marushi Bicycles

Maruishi mudguard kangaroo ornament

Maruishi Cycle Ltd. is a prestigious bicycle manufacturer perhaps best-known today for its vintage models that until late in the 20th century also included penny farthings. Maruishi continues to make fine touring bikes in Japan. The company’s history dates back to 1894, though it has been Chinese-owned since 2006.
Of greatest interest for Kangaeroo readers, though, is that Maruishi’s symbol throughout its history has been a kangaroo!
Why Maruishi chose a kangaroo remains a mystery, though its cycles are renowned for their luggage-bearing capability, which probably goes some way toward providing an explanation.
Although current Maruishi kangaroo displays appear largely limited to bicycle decals and store signage, marsupial images once adorned mudguards in the form of ornaments, frame plates, cranks and bells.

Maruishi kangaroo mudguard ornament


Maruishi kangaroo bell


Maruishi kangaroo plate


Official Maruishi logo


Marushi store signage

Goanna Girl Drags Reptile from Restaurant

Samia Lila, a.k.a. ‘Goanna girl,’ is a French waitress on a working holiday visa who dragged a goanna from a New South Wales restaurant.

Samia Lila drags a goanna from a restaurant


At first, Lila thought it was a canine intruder.

The goanna frightened diners.

Lila then decided to grab it and drag it out.

“I looked at it and thought it was a dog at first! But then I realised it was a goanna,” Lila said.

Surgical Mask Vending Machine

Japan is a land of vending machines. You can find vending machines on just about any street corner in cities. They mainly sell beverages, but the ubiquitous machines also sell a vast array of other items, including gifts, toys, fresh eggs, rice, birth control, cigarettes, beer, costumes and even surgical masks, as shown here.

Arse Wind?

Walking along Route 246, I was surprised to look up and see the katakana script reading アースウィンド!
 びっくり仰天だった!
アースis, in English, arse…or, so I thought. Arse wind, then, could only mean one thing….surely a company couldn’t have named itself after a fart?
Of course it didn’t. In fact, アース is also the reading for earth. That makes Earth Wind a little easier to comprehend, even if the English is still a little awkward.