Tag: cycling

Tour de Kagoshima-Kyoto Day 9: Nara to Kyoto

Our tour has reached Kyoto, remarkably with only minor injuries and not a single puncture in the more than 11,000 kilometers the cyclists covered collectively since setting out from Izumi, Kagoshima Prefecture, on the morning of October 1.

The group battled a barrage of rain on the most prominent of climbs on Mount Aso and Koyasan, but got through unscathed each time.

The tour drew to a close in a journey between the two ancient capitals of Nara, where participants frolicked with the deer roaming freely through the city and saw its lauded Great Buddha at Todaiji, and Kyoto, where the group lunched at Inari Taisha Jinja.

Only a farewell dinner remains in a tour that passed way too quickly, but ends with typically outstanding timing as Typhoon No. 19 prepares to slam into Japan.

Incredibly, the final leg of the tour also included an unexpected encounter with a pack of kangaroos.

These marsupials were manufactured types, though, located in a children’s playground alongside the bicycle track running between Nara and Kyoto. The poor macropods had been crafted with a look of sheer terror on their face, perhaps because they were aware of Kangaeroo’s shoddy guiding?

Brommie performed outstandingly on the final leg of the tour.

His broken rack makes him harder to push, but that shouldn’t be an issue for a couple of days at least while he carries Kangaeroo back to Tokyo.

Thanks to Pedal Pedal, Japan Biking and all the tour participants for making it such a magnificent time for Brommie and Kangaeroo.

Safe travels!

And so it goes.

Tour de Kagoshima-Kyoto Day 7: Wakayama to Koyasan

Japan, the land of the gods, threw everything at the Tour de Kagoshima-Kyoto on Day 8, but the riders came up trumps, scaling the queen stage unscathed.


Despite persistent drizzle, the tour made it to the World Heritage List site Koyasan without injury or incident.

The tour’s first flat even still remains unclaimed!

Following the previous day’s travelling exertions, it was back on the bikes from Wakayama.

Almost half of the day’s ride was occupied on a beautiful cycling track with barely anybody else using it.

The track ran along the Kinokawa River and offered some nice views of the waterway, as well as distant mountains.

Looming over cyclists, however, was the constant presence of Koyasan.

The ride remained steady until lunch. Surprisingly, Kangaeroo’s early group ran into another bunch that were supposed to have been well behind, but had taken a short cut. The entire troup met for a superb lunch of chirashi-zushi and some also had ice creams.

Forecast rain arrived barely minutes into the afternoon leg and was a near constant thereafter.

As riders gained elevation, visibility was lost.

By the time the troupe reached the Daimon gate at the summit of Koyasan to welcome visitors to the Buddhist town, mist was so thick the normally imposing gate could barely be seen.

Showers were more welcome than usual following the cold, wet ride.

Warming cyclists’ hearts, however, was the news that the tour’s climbing is essentially over and it is, literally, all downhill from here (actually, there’s lots of flats, but nobody wants to let the truth get in the way of a good yarn, do they?)

And Brommie? Well, with so much climbing there was really only one place for the old foldup to play a part….warming up the back of the truck. His day will come again soon.

Tour de Kagoshima-Kyoto Day 6: Uchiko to Matsuyama

Shikoku’s glorious mountains seemed less and less attractive at times while pounding the pedals to push on upward even higher, but a wonderful descent followed on the final day of riding on the smallest of Japan’s four main islands.

Leaving Uchiko later than most starts, it was a steady climb upward for the remainder of the morning.

The strenuous efforts of the climbs were rewarded by priceless views across seemingly endless mountain ranges, whose splendor was enhanced by the brilliant sunshine and cloudless skies.

More climbing continued after lunch (the day would eventually top 1,100 meters of elevation).

An exhilarating and lengthy descent followed, though, winding downward through mandarin patches and bamboo groves.

The latter part of the trip was at sea level, first winding its way through the rice paddies, then along the coast of the Seto Inland Sea before moving inland and following the river into central Matsuyama.

The tour’s ride ended adjacent to Dogo Onsen, Japan’s oldest and most-renowned hot spring bath.

Brommie remained banished in light of the hardcore climbing earlier in the day.

With the next leg of the tour being its steepest and hardest climb of all, it seems a fate likely to continue.

For the time being, though he is looking after the other bikes in the tour. They have been packed in a van ahead of the tour’s rest day, when the troupe travels by bus and ferry to Honshu.

Brommie’s planned Saikyo to Teito Trip is looking increasingly likely to be a washout, with rain forecast for the scheduled four days of the planned odyssey.

Tour de Kagoshima-Kyoto Day 4: Kurokawa to Beppu

Glorious weather greeted the tour today, paving the way for some amazing riding.

The group set out from the gloriously quaint hot spring resort town of Kurokawa.

Slowly but surely, the riders wound their way through forested areas, driving ever upward until reaching the Kuju ski ground, the highest point of the entire tour at 1,140 meters above sea level.

Despite reaching the tour’s literal high point, it wasn’t all downhill from there.

Travels along undulating roads followed over the next 30 or so kilometers along beautiful thoroughfares such as the Yamanami Kaido.

The group inched ever downward, though, until reaching the hot spring town of Yufuin.

Following a delicious lunch, the way out of Yufuin involved a brutally grueling climb at a back-breakingly slow pace.

Once the climb was over, it was for the most part a descent at furious pace along National Route 500.

Upon reaching the outskirts of Beppu, it was off the main track and onto a switchback for some more fun.

Brommie near Beppu

Brommie performed brilliantly in circumstances not ideal for him with so much climbing. He incurred his first problem of the tour when his chain tensioner flew off, but this was the result of Kangaeroo over-oiling him.

Once the tensioner was re-applied, it was all systems go again, but Kangaeroo is jeopardizing others’ fun, so it looks like Brommie will be packed away again for a while.

Tour de Kagoshima-Kyoto Day 2: Hinagu to Ozu

The tour’s drive into Kyushu moved northward on its second day of riding, and first when inclement weather came into play.

Rain fell about halfway through the 72-km leg, drenching riders, but fortunately not resulting in any injuries or accidents.

The trip was largely along the plains of Kyushu, following rivers and train tracks through to the industrial city of Yatsushiro.

From there, it was a trip along similar terrain through the areas hit by the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquakes and onto Ozu.

Brommie in Ozu

The tour next moves into the mountains with the long-awaited assault on Mount Aso.

Brommie performed superbly, but will face bigger demands hitting the hills.

Tour de Kagoshima-Kyoto Day 1: Izumi to Hinagu

The tour kicked off on the bikes with a ride through a samurai household neighborhood in Izumi and then moved its way through mandarin groves while heading toward the coast.

Riders reached Minamata, which gave its name to one of the world’s best-known instances of industrial disease. Despite it’s bleak and tragic past, Minamata is quite quaint.

From Minamata it was a trek around the glorious Ashikita Coast. Roads were almost traffic free and the journey was peaceful and quite with wonderful views of the seas and Amakusa Islands in the distance.

The rode drew to a close with a tough climb and descent back down to the coast and along a railroad through to the destination of Hinagu. Tour cyclists stayed in the opulent Kinparo ryokan dating back to 1909.

The day ended with a multi-course banquet so full of carbs it makes the remaining days’ cycling a necessity rather than fun!

Tour de Kagoshima-Kyoto Day 0: Izumi

Brommie in Izumi

Participants rolled in, bike fittings are over, the briefing dinner is done and all are off to bed to ready themselves for the real ride, starting tomorrow.

People assembled from across Australia, but mostly Sydney, to take part in the trip.

The journey will start from Izumi, traverse Kyushu, head over and across Shikoku before meandering its way though the Kansai region to the ancient capital of Kyoto.

Let’s have an awesome trip!