Category: Japanese Kangaroos

Nurturing the Soul

British Poet Laureate Alfred Austin once wrote, “To nurture a garden is to feed not just on the bodybut the soul.” Kangaeroo is getting to find that out.

Gardening never really meant much to Kangaeroo, other than getting dragged out of bed as a youth on Saturday mornings to mow the bloody lawn with an antiquated, run-down Victa lawnmower.

Never the most energetic or enthusiastic of people at the best of times, the onerous task colored Kangaeroo’s views on gardening for decades, despite all family members showing a penchant and delight for gardening.

Having spent the vast majority of those aforementioned decades in Japan, where apartment life had been the norm and having a garden, even on a balcony, was rarely an issue, gardening was something that barely entered Kangaeroo’s consciousness.

However, having been blessed by circumstance and the amazing Alex Endo, gardening has become a daily delight.

Who could have dreamed that search and destroy missions for weeds could be so much fun?

And it’s a delight to enjoy the neighbors’ gardens, too, as well as to share information with them on the delights of getting out in the garden.

Fortunately, if a less-than-successful year so far, if nothing else the warmer months of 2022 in Tokyo have had finer than usual weather, which has also made the garden even more enjoyable.

The Aussie animals filling Kangaeroo’s garden are sure enjoying it, and so are the neighborhood cats and birds who are donating their unprocessed fertilizers!

A Slice of Oz Enchantment

Somewhere in the backblocks of Tokyo’s Tama district, there’s a little Aussie enchantment at work.

It could be coming from this jen, who stands about 1 meter high.

She’s nestled in among the bark and grevillias.

Her joey is enjoying the ride.

And they’re lit up at night.

東京多摩地区裏のある所に、オーストラリアの小さなな魔法場所がある。

由来が約1メートルもある身長のこの雌カンガルーにあるかな?

バークとロベスタの中に寄り添っている。

子カンガルーも楽しく同乗している。

そして、夜になるとライトアップされます。

Kangaroo Coven

Koala Colony

Kangaeroo.com Kit Dares to Dazzle!

Kangaeroo.com jersey rear

The third, and latest, version of Kangaeroo.com cycling kit has come off the production line and is ready to dazzle.

This year, for the first time ever, Kangaeroo.com cycling kit includes a vest and bib shorts.

The kit is a full supplement of spring-summer gear in a predominantly Aussie-wattle hue with gum-leaf green lettering.

The brighter gear reflects a shift to a new environment.

Kangaeroo.com cycling kit comprises a jersey, bib shorts and vest.

The jersey features the Kangaeroo.com thinking kangaroo logo on the front, rear and both sleeves.

The website title and URL also appear on the front, rear and sleeves.

The jersey base is wattle gold with gum leaf green lettering.

Kangaeroo.com jersey front

Meanwhile, the spring vest is an almost identical design, but has a larger logo and no lettering on the front.

And the bib shorts are black with wattle gold side panels containing the Kangaeroo.com logo and website URL in English on the right leg and Japanese on the left leg.

Kangaeroo.com kit first appeared in 2017 with a white jersey, black sleeves and an embroidery patch kangaroo on the left sleeve.

A second version of the kit came out two years later, this time entirely black.

Both kits featured the website title in Japanese and English, the URL and the thinking kangaroo logo on the front and rear of the shirts.

Kangaeroo is a portmanteau of the Japanese word kangaeru, to think, and ‘roo, an abbreviation of kangaroo, Australia’s national animal and a symbol of the country.

Plastic Roos and Fuji Views

The Izu Peninsula about 100 km southwest of Tokyo is a sheer delight in many ways, not the least of which is that there’re plenty of kangaroos there at the moment!

Not that they’re real roos jumping around here and there on the peninsula.

Some of the zoos and animal parks in the area, which is blessed with glorious coastlines and numerous mountains, do have their marsupials.

But the kangaroos that stand out most to the ordinary visitor are the life-sized PVC statues plugging Izu Shaboten Zoo (notable for its various different types of cacti).

The zoo is located at the foot of the amazing Mount Omuro, which is shorn of most of its foliage each winter by being set alight in a spectacular bonfire.

Mount Omuro also offers panoramic views of southeastern Izu, including some of the most spectacular vistas of Mount Fuji imaginable.

The Kangaeroos got to spend some time in the area recently, even managing to snap a few illuminated marsupials as well.

Kangaroos, potaroos, wallabies and emus give the Izu Shaboten Zoo a bit of an Aussie flavor.

Beauty, Athleticism Driving Boom in Sales of Kangaroo Meat in Japanese Convenience Stores

Kangaroo meat is selling like hotcakes in Japanese convenience stores.
Sales of protein-related products are skyrocketing against a backdrop of growing fascination for weight training.

All protein-related products grew 40% year on year at Natural Lawson convenience stores from fiscal 2018 to fiscal 2019.

And September 2019 sales increased 70% YoY, with kangaroo meat being a prime driver at the chain’s 143 stores in the Tokyo metropolitan area.

Tokyo-based Vasel Inc. sells kangaroo meat under the RooMeat and Paroo brands throughout Japan, including the roo jerky selling strongly at convenience stores.

“Kangaroo meat is the pinnacle of red meats. Its saturated fats are 20 times better for you than beef and kangaroo meat is really popular among women with a strong awareness of beauty,” a Vasel spokesman recently told the Japanese media.

Vasel’s targets are those seeking an athlete’s diet of high-protein, low calorie foods, and women with a strong awareness of beauty and maintaining a healthy weight.

Kangaroo meat is not produced by keeping roos as livestock, but by capturing wild kangaroos and processing the meat. Vasel has imported kangaroo meat into Japan from Australia since the 1980s. Demand has grown significantly in recent years and it now imports 50 tons annually.

“There’s growing interest in red meat. Game is becoming increasingly popular within the dining industry. Women and athletes who are concerned with their health are eating kangaroo. We have focused on branding the meat as RooMeat since 2014, and the robust sales we’re seeing now are probably reflecting that,” the Vasel spokesman said.

Campbelltown Forest of Wild Birds A Slice of Oz in Sleepy Saitama

Koshigaya, located some 30 kilometers from downtown Tokyo, and Campbelltown, which is situated about 50 kilometers from Sydney’s central business district, were almost made for each other, even if only serving as satellite cities for their respective countries’ largest cities.
Koshigaya and Campbelltown are sister cities and it’s hard to see a better example of the custom than the relationship between the Japanese bed town and its Aussie sibling.
Koshigaya is also home to a picturesque corner of Australia, complete with wallabies, emus and some lovely wild birds, including rainbow lorikeets, superb parrots, Major Mitchell’s cockatoos, tawny frogmouths and kookaburras.
The Campbelltown Forest of Wild Birds in Koshigaya could arguably be one of the Kanto Plains areas best-kept secrets.
Though only a small-scale park, the attraction is overall an excellent one as it gives a reasonably close view of some delightfully colorful (mostly) Australian birds in a fairly authentic aviary, the largest of its type in Japan.
Surrounding the aviary are plenty of gum trees, adding to the Down Under-flavor of the Saitama Prefecture city.
Koshigaya and Saitama became sister cities in 1984, one of the earliest formal relationships between local governments in Australia and Japan.
The Campbelltown Forest of Wild Birds opened in 1995 to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the sister-city relationship.
Campbelltown reciprocates with its Koshigaya Park, containing Japanese gardens.
Details of the Campbelltown Forest of Wild Birds in Koshigaya are as follows:
Campbelltown Forest of Wild Birds(Japanese link)
272-1 Daikichi, Koshigaya, Saitama Prefecture, 343-0008
Open: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Closed Mondays, new year season holidays
Entrance fees: Adults 100 yen, children (primary and middle-school students) 30 yen
Related information on Koshigaya-Campbelltown ties
Campbelltown-Koshigaya Sister Cities Association
Campbelltown City Council page on sister city relations
Campbelltown-Koshigaya Sister Cities Association student delegates arrive to celebrate the 30th anniversary of their relationship
Campbelltown-Koshigaya friendship is 30 years young