Tag: kangaroo

A Slice of Oz Enchantment

Somewhere in the backblocks of Tokyo’s Tama district, there’s a little Aussie enchantment at work.

It could be coming from this jen, who stands about 1 meter high.

She’s nestled in among the bark and grevillias.

Her joey is enjoying the ride.

And they’re lit up at night.

東京多摩地区裏のある所に、オーストラリアの小さなな魔法場所がある。

由来が約1メートルもある身長のこの雌カンガルーにあるかな?

バークとロベスタの中に寄り添っている。

子カンガルーも楽しく同乗している。

そして、夜になるとライトアップされます。

Kangaroo Coven

Koala Colony

Kangaeroo.com Kit Dares to Dazzle!

Kangaeroo.com jersey rear

The third, and latest, version of Kangaeroo.com cycling kit has come off the production line and is ready to dazzle.

This year, for the first time ever, Kangaeroo.com cycling kit includes a vest and bib shorts.

The kit is a full supplement of spring-summer gear in a predominantly Aussie-wattle hue with gum-leaf green lettering.

The brighter gear reflects a shift to a new environment.

Kangaeroo.com cycling kit comprises a jersey, bib shorts and vest.

The jersey features the Kangaeroo.com thinking kangaroo logo on the front, rear and both sleeves.

The website title and URL also appear on the front, rear and sleeves.

The jersey base is wattle gold with gum leaf green lettering.

Kangaeroo.com jersey front

Meanwhile, the spring vest is an almost identical design, but has a larger logo and no lettering on the front.

And the bib shorts are black with wattle gold side panels containing the Kangaeroo.com logo and website URL in English on the right leg and Japanese on the left leg.

Kangaeroo.com kit first appeared in 2017 with a white jersey, black sleeves and an embroidery patch kangaroo on the left sleeve.

A second version of the kit came out two years later, this time entirely black.

Both kits featured the website title in Japanese and English, the URL and the thinking kangaroo logo on the front and rear of the shirts.

Kangaeroo is a portmanteau of the Japanese word kangaeru, to think, and ‘roo, an abbreviation of kangaroo, Australia’s national animal and a symbol of the country.

Plastic Roos and Fuji Views

The Izu Peninsula about 100 km southwest of Tokyo is a sheer delight in many ways, not the least of which is that there’re plenty of kangaroos there at the moment!

Not that they’re real roos jumping around here and there on the peninsula.

Some of the zoos and animal parks in the area, which is blessed with glorious coastlines and numerous mountains, do have their marsupials.

But the kangaroos that stand out most to the ordinary visitor are the life-sized PVC statues plugging Izu Shaboten Zoo (notable for its various different types of cacti).

The zoo is located at the foot of the amazing Mount Omuro, which is shorn of most of its foliage each winter by being set alight in a spectacular bonfire.

Mount Omuro also offers panoramic views of southeastern Izu, including some of the most spectacular vistas of Mount Fuji imaginable.

The Kangaeroos got to spend some time in the area recently, even managing to snap a few illuminated marsupials as well.

Kangaroos, potaroos, wallabies and emus give the Izu Shaboten Zoo a bit of an Aussie flavor.

世界最高EVがKangarooだ!

イタリアのデザイン事務所が手掛けたGFG Style社は、この度世界で最も格好いいEVお披露目した。

同社は、今進行中のジェネバ国際モーターショーにてKangarooという超いきている電気自動車 (EV)を展示している。

Kangaroo車が最速時速が250キロであり、1回分の充電で走行距離が約450キロとされています。

やっぱ、kangarooがどんな形でもかっこいいよね。

Kangaroos Played a Part in Germans Being Big in South America BEFORE World War II

Postwar South America became somewhat notorious as a haven for Germans fleeing the defeat of the Third Reich in World War II, but some Teutonic types had already made it big in Argentina before the Nazis…and kangaroos had something to do with it, albeit an extremely minor role.

Kangaroos served as an advertising figure for Sarrasani, a world-famous German circus between the wars. Sarrasani was formed in the German city of Dresden in 1901 by Hans Stosch, a clown with the stage name Giovanni Sarrasani. The circus was best-known for its elephants, but also employed lots of “exotic” peoples such as Japanese, Javanese and Sioux Native Americans, as well as the then rarely seen marsupials.

The circus boomed throughout the 1920s, when Sarrasani also wrote pulp fiction cowboy stories. Stosch’s son, also Hans, ran the circus until his death in the early 1940s and was succeeded by his widow. The Sarrasani circus was destroyed by the Bombing of Dresden in 1945.

Trude Stosch-Sarrasani re-established the circus in Argentina in the 1940s, even calling it the Argentinean National Circus to appease nationalist Peronistas at one stage.

The circus returned to Germany following German reunification in 1990 and continues to operate.

My Goodness, Guinness…It’s a Kangaroo!

For much of the 20th century, Irish brewery Guinness used kangaroos for its advertising.

There was apparently no particular reason that advertiser John Gilroy selected kangaroos for a famous series of ads featuring exotic animals that the brewer used from the 1920s through to the 1960s and still common today.

The kangaroos in the ads were notorious for sneaking away a pint of stout in their pouches.

In addition to posters, the kangaroos featured in early TV ads, adorned coasters and were used for Carlton Ware figurines and even a salt-and-pepper shaker.

The advertisements ran under such copy as “Guinness is Good For You,” “My Goodness, My Guinness” and “Ask for a Baby Guinness.”

Guinness even ran a competition to name a joey born at Adelaide Zoo.

Archive Fact Sheet: Gilroy and Animals
How the Guinness Toucan Became the Brewery’s Most Iconic Mascot