Japan Fixation Looms Large in Aussie Rules Tragedy

The late Phillip Walsh as a Richmond Tigers player in the 1980s

The late Phillip Walsh as a Richmond Tigers player in the 1980s

Japan has assumed an unwittingly large presence in the tragic death of Adelaide Football Club coach Phillip Walsh, aged 55, on July 3.
Walsh was fatally stabbed in his Adelaide home just months into his stint as coach of the Australian Football League’s Adelaide Crows.
Walsh’s 26-year-old son, Cy, is currently in custody, charged with the murder of his father.
Walsh, a lifelong associate of Australian football as a player and coach
Cy Walsh's blog entry outlining his fixation with Asian women

Cy Walsh’s blog entry outlining his fixation with Asian women

at various levels, had spoken publicly of how his obsession with football had created rifts within his family.
The slain Adelaide coach had taken up studying the Japanese language in 2012 after a near-death experience in Peru.
Speculation is that Walsh’s attraction to Japanese came from his son’s fixation with learning the language and having a Japanese girlfriend.
Cy Walsh spent a year in Kumamoto as an exchange student in 2007 and, according to media reports, obtained formal qualifications in the language. His alma mater continues to use his name as an advertisement for its exchange program with schools in Kyushu.
The younger Walsh was obsessed with Japan and learning how to speak Japanese, with nearly every entry in a 2009 blog focusing on his efforts to learn the language and one candid entry titled “the asian girlfriend project” in which he says “I MUST have an asian girlfriend and I MUST become good at japanese.”
He was not averse to racial slurs, however, writing a planned meeting with a Japanese woman that he had a “hope its (sic) not just her and like 2 other japs (sic).”
The younger Walsh also blogged about drug and alcohol abuse, once writing that when becoming “blind drunk” he would “become a wild beast of emotion in general, hate, love, sadness, watever (sic).”
Speculation is rife that Cy Walsh allegedly stabbed his father in an ice-fueled frenzy. He is currently being held under sedation in a secure psychiatric facility.
Phil Walsh played for Collingwood, Richmond and Brisbane before taking on coaching roles at Geelong, Port Adelaide, West Coast and Adelaide.
As has been noted in previous entries, Australian Rules football is the most popular sport in the country and occupies an almost religious presence in the heart of many Australians.

Cy Walsh’s 2009 Blog, “More than a man: Words may show a man’s wit but actions his meaning”

Waltzing Matildas Take on Nervy Nadeshiko

during the FIFA Women's World Cup 2015 round of 16 match between Brazil and Australia at Moncton Stadium on June 21, 2015 in Moncton, Canada.

Australia’s Matildas

Fierce Asian Football Confederation rivals Australia and Japan meet in a Women’s World Cup quaterfinal in Edmonton, Canada, on June 27, local time.
アジアサッカー連盟ライバルであるオーストラリアの「マティルダーズ(雌カンガルーの意味)」となでしこジャパンが女子ワールド・カップ準々決勝をカナダエドモントン26日で行なう。
Reigning World and Asian champions Nadeshiko Japan go into the match as firm favorites, but Australia’s Matildas have much going for them following a shock upset win against Brazil in the Round of 16.

世界及びアジアチャンピオンであるなでしこジャパンが優勝候補であり、今回勝利が有力視されるが、ブラジルに思わず勝ったオーストラリアでも好意な条件もあり、日本が油断できない。
Nadeshiko Japan has not lost to the Matildas since 2010, when the Australians won 1-0 on a counter after being on the back foot for most of the night.
なでしこジャパンは、2010年以降オーストラリアに負けていない。最後に負けても試合を支配しながらカウンターでゴールが奪われた。
Australia has suddenly adopted the women’s football team since it defeated Brazil and has made much of Nadeshiko goalkeeper Ayumi Kaihori’s awful howler to concede a consolation goal to the Dutch as Japan defeated the Netherlands to set up the quarter-final clash. The Matildas have also had two extra days to prepare, and one of Japan’s days between matches was spent traveling for the most part.
オーストラリアでは長年女子サッカーを無視したがブラジルに勝ってからいきなりマティルダーズが高く評価されるようになった。豪マスゴミは、今週中、なでしこゴールキーパーである海堀あゆみの大失敗によってオランダのゴールを大げさに報道されており、日本を軽視している傾向である。また、オーストラリアの試合に対しての準備時間が日本より二日間多く、なでしこの試合間の中まる一日が交通するように使われ、疲労している見らている。
Nonetheless, the Nadeshiko are too technically talented and disciplined and should emerge victorious if they prepare well for Australian counterattacks.
しかし、これにしても、なでしこジャパンが技術・組織的にマティルダーズに対してレベルが極めて上にあり、カウンターに注意するさえであれば、恐らく準決勝に進むことが無難だろう。
Ayumi Kaihori Super Blunder

Preview: Matildas v Japan
Matildas v Japan: last three encounters
Women’s World Cup 2015: the Australian trailblazers taking on the world in Canada
Matildas v Japan live: coverage of Australia’s Women’s World Cup quarter-final

AFL – Modern Australia’s Religion and Failed Proselytizing in Japan

If post-European colonization Australian has any sort of religion, there’s a good argument to be made that it could be the indigenous code of football, known as Australian Rules.

171_001For most Australians in the southern part of the country, footy provides them with the closest opportunity they will have to a tribal allegiance and generally loyalties toward their team are fervent and frequently location based even now (and almost exclusively the further you go back into the past).
The Australian Football League (AFL), administer of the sport, to this day tries to spread the Aussie footy message overseas, but the reality is that the game remains local.

Scenes from Aussie Bowl '86

Scenes from Aussie Bowl ’86

Nonetheless, its impact on Australians is undeniable, with millions viewing games every week, either at stadiums or on television, and its influence on society is pervasive, even in the northern states of New South Wales and Queensland, where forms of rugby have traditionally been the favorite football codes.
It was part of the effort to spread the charm of Australian football overseas that Japan became involved. Australian football garnered a modicum of appeal in the United States through screenings on the ESPN sports cable channel.
From there interest arose from Japan’s Fuji TV, then flush with funds from the country’s bubbling economy and its series of phenomenally successful “trendy drama” shows with sky-high ratings bringing in almost boundless advertising revenue.
Ironically, on May 20, 1986, just as the Victorian Football League (the AFL’s predecessor) was poised to announce that its Melbourne-based game was to expand to encompass teams from Western Australia and Queensland, there also came the announcement of the “Aussie Bowl,” an Australian Rules game to be played at Yokohama Stadium by that year’s grand finalists.
Fuji TV had proposed the game and would bankroll it, providing the winning team with $20,000 and the best player with a new car. Total costs estimated at AUD$2 million would be borne by Fuji in exchange for global broadcast rights.
The game would be played as 15-a-side, three players fewer than normal due to the diamond-shape stadium instead of the oval ground the game is usually played on.
Fuji promoted the game heavily, running special features in magazines and manga associated with its media network and tickets sold like “tempura hot cakes,” according to one Australian commentator at the time. J-Walk, then an up-and-coming band, released the single Hono no Senshi (炎の戦士) to promote the game and it became a minor hit.
Aussie Rules was on the verge of becoming Japan’s flavor of the month just as the country’s newlyweds were also starting to fall in love with Down Under.
19860520 Aussie Bowl 86
Nov. 3, 1986, duly rolled around.
Culture Day in Japan, a national holiday, and good enough for a crowd of about 25,000 to roll up and watch the VFL Premiers Hawthorn Hawks continue their Grand Final dominance over the Carlton Blues, winning 22.17 (149) to 13.18 (96).
The ground announcer was Ichiro Furutachi.
A scene from Aussie Bowl '86

A scene from Aussie Bowl ’86

By all accounts, the game was a success. Robert Dipierdomenico would be voted player of the match and Aussie Rules was helping Australia gain a foothold in the affections of ordinary Japanese, joining koalas and frill-necked lizards as a symbol of the land Down Under.
Plans for Aussie Bowl ‘87 started immediately.
The pattern was similar: that year’s Grand Finalists would meet later in Yokohama, a huge crowd would attend and Fuji and the VFL/AFL would make a killing.
That was the plan, but things didn’t quite work out that way.
Many players from Carlton had apparently been reluctant participants in the 1986 game, which came some six weeks after they had been defeated in the Grand Final and had hoped to be on holiday. There had, as hinted at in a much-later column from then Carlton star and future Victorian State Government Cabinet Minister Justin Madden, been some minor cultural clashes between the “easygoing” Aussies and “time obsessed” Japanese.
Even though the Japan match was moved back a week to accommodate the players’ post-season vacation plans and then Carlton President John Elliott made threats against reluctant participants, the Blues qualified by making the 1987 Grand Final (again against Hawthorn) but by then had already pulled out and been replaced by the Essendon Bombers, the Hawks’ other great rivals of the 1980s.
19861106 Aussie Bowl 86
More troubles followed.
A typhoon swept over the Kanto Region in the days leading up to the Oct. 25 match.
In the two days before the game, Yokohama had been pounded by torrential rain. Prices for the match were also steep, more than double the cost of a Grand Final ticket and about four times what it would normally cost to watch a game of baseball at the same stadium.
Regardless of Japan being awash with cash, the previous year’s novelty appeal had not been maintained despite the game being plugged by Romancing Yard, a theme song by Chage & ASKA, at the time one of Japan’s biggest acts.
Only about 13,000 turned up to watch, many of whom were left wondering whether Essendon had turned up to play as the Hawks flogged the Bombers by about 10 goals (nobody is quite sure what the actual final score was).
It seemed Aussie Rules would continue to try and cultivate the Japanese market, which then appeared poised to become the world’s largest.
Suntory Ltd., one of Japan’s largest brewers, would use Aussie Rules and Mark “Jacko” Jackson to promote its beers.

But, around about that time, the bean counters stepped in. Fuji found financing Aussie Rules to be unsustainable, even in an age when it was the norm to throw money around on losing causes. The VFL wouldn’t or couldn’t continue to pay the cost of promoting the Australian game in Japan. And that was just about that.
19871026 Aussie Bowl 87
That’s not to say there wasn’t a legacy. For Aussie Bowl ’87, two university teams formed to play a curtain raiser to the main clash. From that, a Japanese Aussie Rules league formed, centered on university students. The league, the Australian Football League Japan, remains to this day.
Aussie Bowl 86 TuckieIt also forms the basis for the Japan Samurais, the team that competes in the International Cup.
The league grows yearly on a tiny base, but it looks great! It has even contributed a player who vied for selection in high-ranked Australian football leagues beneath the national league almost a decade ago.
Ichiro Furudate, the ground announcer for Aussie Bowl ’86, remains a nightly presence on Japanese TV as the anchor for TV Asahi’s News Station.
Others weren’t so lucky.
Koichi Nakamura, lead vocalist and the face of J-Walk, which had done the theme for Aussie Bowl ’86 would see his career in tatters following multiple convictions for drug possession and a term behind bars.
Aussie Bowl 86 Theme SongMirroring that was a drug conviction for Aska from the Aussie Bowl ’87 theme song performers, Chage and Aska.
Roles the performers had played in proselytizing Aussie Rules were long forgotten.
Perhaps the closest Japan has come to having a role to play in contemporary Aussie Rules was Essendon visiting for a Buddhism-inspired pre-season trip in 2006.
Or, perhaps even more recently, there was former bad boy Brendon Fevola tattooing his wife’s name on his arm in katakana script.
But even Fevola has been off the AFL scene for a five years now.
But the halcyon days of Aussie Rules given prime-time airtime in Japan are now decades in the past and unlikely to ever arise again.
1986 Record Promotion
1987 Record Promotion

An Australian Christmas

christmas-kangaroo
Australians have a special way of spreading Christmas cheer
Ploughing snow is a big no-no, we have sun over here
Roos R-L
Christmas pud is a pav instead, while lunch is on the beach
Cold ham replaces turkey, And we have three servings each

Kangaroos help Santa out, ‘Cause reindeer just won’t do
For they don’t know the bush so well, roos just bound on through

Forget the fur lined boots this year, thongs are what we need
Rudolf will have to sit it out, while Skippy takes the lead

But don’t you worry, have no fear, Santa’s used to us down here!

NSFW (or kids) Classic Australian Christmas Song

A Little-Known, Bizarre Australia-Japan Christmas Story

豪のクリスマス・ソング:Deck the Shed
豪のクリスマス・ソング:Christmas on the Station
豪のクリスマス・ソング:Christmas Photo
豪のクリスマス・ソング:Aussie Jingle Bells
豪のクリスマス・ソング:Six White Boomers

South African band Die Antwoord also does an interesting cover of Kevin Bloody Wilson‘s Australian Christmas classic.