No Wonder the Wallabies Were Wallies in RWC2019

Australia’s rugby team, the Wallabies, were ignominiously dumped from the 2019 Rugby World Cup that Japan is currently hosting (and being lauded for both its organization skills and the rousing performance of its unfancied team).

The Wallabies lost badly to England in a quarter final, mostly because they were not good enough as a team.

But Kangaeroo.com has also discovered another reason for the Wallabies’ woes.

Gorgeous Jindaiji Temple, which supported the Wallabies’ woeful World Cup, is situated in the Tokyo suburb of Chofu, location of the Aussies’ group stage loss against Wales on September 29 that effectively derailed their campaign on the field.

Jindaiji had proudly displayed Wallabies jerseys (alongside a Brave Blossoms team shirt, too, it should be noted) and supported the Australian team as it tried to regain the William Webb Ellis Trophy it last won in 1999.

The temple also displayed a daruma, a doll traditionally used to pray for good luck in Japan, as well as a message wishing the team well. Here is that message, reproduced in full (with spelling and grammatical errors intact):

The conetents the priest preached when he visited the camping place for the match

Daruma is a Japanese style a bringere of good luck which you can find at restaurants, in the houses and so son. This Daruma is representing a monk who was meditating for 9 years. When you think about meditation, you might think it’s static, but actually during meditation we are fighting against and enduring something like weakness or anger or worldly desires. Meditation is not just static, but also conflicting against ourselves. that’s the training of Buddhism and that’s the spirit which Daruma is showing to us. This spirit is exactly like the spirit of Rugby. It’s very dynamic in contrast, but you play desperately for one goal with focused. In Japan, there is a proverb associated with this Daruma. that is “Fall seven times, stand up eight.” It is a saying about never giving up no matter how many times life knocks you down because Daruma always comes back after falling down. The important thing is same in Sports. The high spirits touch people’s hearts. So, like this daruma, attend to the spirit and concentrate on the game and play a good game which touches people. I believe that this Daruma which you team put strong wish will bring good result. Today we want you to put one eye into Daruma. Putting an eyes means that you swear to start the mental training and achieve the goal. This ceremony is for the time which you have strong wish, so please don’t fool around make a wish.

Clearly, then, in spite of rumors of a rift in the Wallabies camp, the reason for such a dismal showing by the two-time champions and reigning runners-up was that they fooled around to make a wish.

At least the Wallabies retained the team’s excellence in selecting players with hyphenated names, the squad’s Lukhan Salakaia-Loto, Adam Ashley-Cooper and Dane Haylett-Petty continuing the Australian tradition of picking lads with monikers like Massy-Westropp, Comrie-Thomson, Farr-Jones, Scott-Young, Kenny-Dowall, Waerea-Hargreaves, Tuivasa-Sheck, Asofa-Solomona, Polota-Nau, Feauai-Sautia, Mann-Rea, Paenga-Amosa and Johnson-Holmes.

Reversing Destiny

Almost 25 years ago, Kangaeroo picked up a newspaper containing an article about a park created for people to experience life in a different perspective.

The Site of Reversible Destiny was created without horizontal and vertical lines to try to shape a new way of looking at art and architecture, as well as life in general.

The revolutionary park was created under a concept of reversible destiny by architect/artist couple Shusaku Arakawa and Madeline Gins.

And Kangaeroo was hooked. A visit to the park was immediately on the bucket list.

And stayed there without being crossed off for 2 1/2 decades.

In the meantime, both Arakawa and Gins died, despite having both dedicated their final decades to works focused on not dying.

A visit almost occurred in October 2018 when Kangaeroo cycled through Yoro, the town in Gifu Prefecture where the park is located. Pressing issues prevented that from happening, though.

Delightfully, another opportunity to get there arose this year, and this time, the long-awaited visit took place.

Kangaeroo found the park a delight, having always enjoyed Dadaism and the avant-garde, which have clearly influenced the work by Arakawa and Gin.

Works inside the park have catchy names Like the Zone of Clearest Confusion, Critical Resemblance House, Kinesthetic Park, Trajectory Membrane Gate and Geographical Ghost, adding to their attractions.

Having finally visited, though, brought about a strange sense of emptiness.

The park is visually spectacular, occupying a large hill and its expansive works spreading widely.

Perhaps the emptiness came from learning about the demise of Arakawa and Gins?

They had both been comparatively young, and still at the peak of their careers, when the park opened.

They died in severely reduced circumstances, having lost large sums to Bernie Madhof’s Ponzi scheme that symbolized the 2008 global financial crisis.

Arakawa died in 2010 and Gins four years later.

Brommie, also something of an anomaly, carried Kangaeroo to the site and fit perfectly into place.

He was supposed to be traveling from Kyoto to Tokyo, but an impending typhoon stopped that and he ended the journey in Nagoya.

It was a reversal of destiny, apt for having finally fulfilled an almost half lifetime’s desire.

Reversible Destiny Foundation

Site of Reversible Destiny Leaflet

Tour de Kagoshima-Kyoto Day 9: Nara to Kyoto

Our tour has reached Kyoto, remarkably with only minor injuries and not a single puncture in the more than 11,000 kilometers the cyclists covered collectively since setting out from Izumi, Kagoshima Prefecture, on the morning of October 1.

The group battled a barrage of rain on the most prominent of climbs on Mount Aso and Koyasan, but got through unscathed each time.

The tour drew to a close in a journey between the two ancient capitals of Nara, where participants frolicked with the deer roaming freely through the city and saw its lauded Great Buddha at Todaiji, and Kyoto, where the group lunched at Inari Taisha Jinja.

Only a farewell dinner remains in a tour that passed way too quickly, but ends with typically outstanding timing as Typhoon No. 19 prepares to slam into Japan.

Incredibly, the final leg of the tour also included an unexpected encounter with a pack of kangaroos.

These marsupials were manufactured types, though, located in a children’s playground alongside the bicycle track running between Nara and Kyoto. The poor macropods had been crafted with a look of sheer terror on their face, perhaps because they were aware of Kangaeroo’s shoddy guiding?

Brommie performed outstandingly on the final leg of the tour.

His broken rack makes him harder to push, but that shouldn’t be an issue for a couple of days at least while he carries Kangaeroo back to Tokyo.

Thanks to Pedal Pedal, Japan Biking and all the tour participants for making it such a magnificent time for Brommie and Kangaeroo.

Safe travels!

And so it goes.

Tour de Kagoshima-Kyoto Day 8: Koyasan to Nara

Glorious weather almost a complete turnaround from the previous day was the hallmark of the penultimate day of the 2019 Kagoshima to Kyoto cycling tour.

Sunny skies greeted the riders as they roused from their sleep in a chilly Koyasan temple.

Riding remained cold and rugging up was the order of the day with the first 20 kilometers of the ride a rousing descent from Koyasan onto the plains of Wakayama Prefecture.

Riders maintained a steady pace following the outstanding bicycle tracks along the Kinokawa River joining Wakayama and Nara prefectures.

Riders passed through some wonderfully quaint mountain villages, rustic farming neighborhoods and winding roads, many barely traversed by other traffic.

Lunch matched the high quality of the ride, with the dishes made earning the highest regard among cyclists of probably any meals served on the tour.

The afternoon was a continuation of the river riding.

Cyclists cranked their bikes along the rivers as they gradually moved toward central Nara.

Finally, after some hiccups in an industrial area and battling train tracks, they wound their way through a delightful series of backstreets in the ancient capital before reaching their lodgings, many completing century treks on the tour’s longest ride.

Perhaps the best news of the day in some regard was the re-emergence of Brommie. The finicky fold-up had virtually no need to climb and would thus not hold up any other riders, so he was given his chance to ride again. And he took it with both wheels open.

Unfortunately, he bumped a few times too many and opened a gash in the welding on his rear rack. Not a major problem, but one that will cost several tens of thousands of yen to repair.

Arriving in Nara, all went their separate ways. Our remaining time together is now less than 24 hours, but we have formed what will hopefully be some lifelong bonds.

Tour de Kagoshima-Kyoto Day 7: Wakayama to Koyasan

Japan, the land of the gods, threw everything at the Tour de Kagoshima-Kyoto on Day 8, but the riders came up trumps, scaling the queen stage unscathed.


Despite persistent drizzle, the tour made it to the World Heritage List site Koyasan without injury or incident.

The tour’s first flat even still remains unclaimed!

Following the previous day’s travelling exertions, it was back on the bikes from Wakayama.

Almost half of the day’s ride was occupied on a beautiful cycling track with barely anybody else using it.

The track ran along the Kinokawa River and offered some nice views of the waterway, as well as distant mountains.

Looming over cyclists, however, was the constant presence of Koyasan.

The ride remained steady until lunch. Surprisingly, Kangaeroo’s early group ran into another bunch that were supposed to have been well behind, but had taken a short cut. The entire troup met for a superb lunch of chirashi-zushi and some also had ice creams.

Forecast rain arrived barely minutes into the afternoon leg and was a near constant thereafter.

As riders gained elevation, visibility was lost.

By the time the troupe reached the Daimon gate at the summit of Koyasan to welcome visitors to the Buddhist town, mist was so thick the normally imposing gate could barely be seen.

Showers were more welcome than usual following the cold, wet ride.

Warming cyclists’ hearts, however, was the news that the tour’s climbing is essentially over and it is, literally, all downhill from here (actually, there’s lots of flats, but nobody wants to let the truth get in the way of a good yarn, do they?)

And Brommie? Well, with so much climbing there was really only one place for the old foldup to play a part….warming up the back of the truck. His day will come again soon.

Tour de Kagoshima-Kyoto Day 7: Matsuyama to Wakayama

A moving day allowed the tour riders to freshen legs ahead of the trip’s biggest climb, but that didn’t mean it was an easy day.

Riders had a free morning in Matsuyama before assembling around midday to catch a bus to Tokushima.

Activities engaged in during the morning included watching a festival, visiting Dogo Onsen hot spring and climbing up to Matsuyama Castle to check out the views of the city.

The bus trip to Tokushima was largely uneventful and after about two hours, participants marched on to the Nankai ferry for the journey to Wakayama, leaving Shikoku in their wake.

The ferry trip lasted about two hours and the troupe arrived on Honshu in the dark.

Taxis were called and a fleet shipped the cyclists into central Wakayama, passing by the brilliantly lit Wakayama Castle.

Brommie, like all the bikes, was not called for today. He won’t be called for tomorrow, either, with the big climb ahead.

Saikyo to Teito is also a write-off, courtesy of the impending typhoon.

Tour de Kagoshima-Kyoto Day 6: Uchiko to Matsuyama

Shikoku’s glorious mountains seemed less and less attractive at times while pounding the pedals to push on upward even higher, but a wonderful descent followed on the final day of riding on the smallest of Japan’s four main islands.

Leaving Uchiko later than most starts, it was a steady climb upward for the remainder of the morning.

The strenuous efforts of the climbs were rewarded by priceless views across seemingly endless mountain ranges, whose splendor was enhanced by the brilliant sunshine and cloudless skies.

More climbing continued after lunch (the day would eventually top 1,100 meters of elevation).

An exhilarating and lengthy descent followed, though, winding downward through mandarin patches and bamboo groves.

The latter part of the trip was at sea level, first winding its way through the rice paddies, then along the coast of the Seto Inland Sea before moving inland and following the river into central Matsuyama.

The tour’s ride ended adjacent to Dogo Onsen, Japan’s oldest and most-renowned hot spring bath.

Brommie remained banished in light of the hardcore climbing earlier in the day.

With the next leg of the tour being its steepest and hardest climb of all, it seems a fate likely to continue.

For the time being, though he is looking after the other bikes in the tour. They have been packed in a van ahead of the tour’s rest day, when the troupe travels by bus and ferry to Honshu.

Brommie’s planned Saikyo to Teito Trip is looking increasingly likely to be a washout, with rain forecast for the scheduled four days of the planned odyssey.